Sunday, 19 February 2017 15:46

Trust and the workplace coaching journey

In our increasingly global and inter-culturally complex workplaces, it is clear that there are complex cultural elements that any coach must recognize, understand, and address!

Published in Global Intelligence

Establish your third cultural space early in the coaching relationship, making sure that it reflects something of those you coach as well as something of yourself.

Published in Global Intelligence
Sunday, 05 February 2017 05:15

Coaching that taps into cultural drivers

The prevalent ideas of motivation in executive coaching need some remapping, and cultural drivers should be tapped into.

Published in Global Intelligence

The art of creating an Organizational Culture that resonates with a global workforce is becoming crucial. This is why we ask organizations several critical questions related to Organizational Culture: What is the current DNA of your organization? Can you put your finger on it? Is your DNA supportive of your strategy for the global market?

Published in Management
Sunday, 18 December 2016 05:27

Discovering the cultural side of sales

Our first article about sales highlighted the behavioral side of becoming a better “decision-making coach” — how a better understanding of our own personality and drivers makes us better at engaging with people, better at building long-term relationships, and better at being a trusted advisor. The Everything DiSC Sales Profile brings these insights and skills to life as it shines a spotlight on our personality and behavior.

Published in Global Intelligence
Sunday, 14 August 2016 07:43

Assessments in IC Settings: Y/N? Part 3

Another reason why Inter-Cultural Intelligence matters!

Published in Personal Development
Sunday, 07 August 2016 00:01

Assessments in IC Settings: Y/N? Part 2

Again, comprehensive assessments can be useful tools! “Getting to the bottom of” your team, learning together what sort of strengths and focus areas might be influencing a team's performance both relationally and transactionally—these can be highly valuable exercises. But as useful as comprehensive assessments can be, they will inevitably cause challenges in intercultural contexts.

Published in Personal Development

Are assessments helpful? Does their helpfulness depend on what construct is being assessed—e.g., personality differences, behavior styles, strengths and focus areas, etc.? Can they be as beneficial in intercultural situations as they are in mono-cultural settings? How might Inter-Cultural Intelligence and an understanding of the Three Colors of Worldview inform how we create and administer assessments?

Published in Personal Development
Sunday, 17 July 2016 09:26

"Openness" is not always better

From time to time, we share stories that illustrate lessons we have learned while facilitating workshops or developing global leaders. Our consultants and coaches certainly have not "arrived," and learning from our own and others' mistakes is part of the ongoing benefit of pursuing Inter-Cultural Intelligence Certification. Here is one of those stories—a tale of a temporary fail that happily resulted in a permanent improvement.

Published in Global Intelligence
Sunday, 10 July 2016 09:54

Aligning Intercultural Teams, Part 2

For at least two decades, high-performance teaming and optimal alignment have been trending in the field of team leadership and development. Leaders who can align and motivate teams to perform effectively and efficiently are always going to be in high demand.

Published in Management
Sunday, 03 July 2016 08:44

Aligning Intercultural Teams, Part 1

There are multiple angles from which to look at leadership team alignment, but applying Inter-Cultural Intelligence takes it to a whole new (and increasingly necessary) level.

Published in Management

Exploring two approaches to conflict resolution in intercultural contexts: This is the 3rd and final part of a brief series on resolving intercultural conflict.

Published in Personal Development

Exploring two approaches to conflict resolution in intercultural contexts: This is Part 2 of a brief series on resolving intercultural conflict.

Published in Personal Development

Series introduction: Beginning to explore two approaches to conflict resolution in intercultural contexts

Published in Personal Development

Musings on the Honor-Shame Paradigm: An exploration of the Honor-Shame Cultural Paradigm, with a view to appreciating its nuances.

Published in Global Intelligence

Musings on the Honor-Shame Paradigm: An exploration of the Honor-Shame Cultural Paradigm, with a view to appreciating its nuances.

Published in Global Intelligence

At least in the mind of someone accustomed to the Innocence-Guilt way of thinking, it boils down to “who dun it": you either did it (and you’re guilty), or you didn’t (and you’re innocent). Did you trespass a law? Did you undermine an absolute? Did you deviate from the straight-and-narrow? Or not?

Published in Global Intelligence

Musings on the Innocence-Guilt Paradigm, Part 2A. Continuing an exploration of the Innocence-Guilt Cultural Paradigm, with a view to appreciating its nuances.

Published in Global Intelligence

Musings on the Innocence-Guilt Paradigm, Part 1b. Continuing an exploration of the Innocence-Guilt Cultural Paradigm, with a view to appreciating its nuances.

Published in Global Intelligence

Musings on the Innocence-Guilt Paradigm, Part 1a. An exploration of the Innocence-Guilt Cultural Paradigm, with a view to appreciating its nuances.

Published in Global Intelligence

Unlocking motivation helps you create a 3rd Cultural Space in which a coaching relationship can thrive.

Published in Global Intelligence

How to improve your communication and avoid costly mistakes.

Published in Global Intelligence

The most important question to ask before making an intercultural presentation.

Published in Global Intelligence
Sunday, 30 September 2012 04:00

Three Colors of Worldview

The Three Colors of Worldview is what we look at first when we try to understand a new situation, because it influences so many other cultural factors. The three, colored lenses get at the beliefs and assumptions underlying behavior and culture: for example, that being seen as honorable is more important than being seen as right. Or that maintaining positional power is more important than being shamed.

Published in Global Intelligence

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